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About Likeonomics

Likeonomics is a new book about why some people and companies are more believable than others and why likeability is the real secret to being more trusted, getting more customers, making more money – and perhaps even changing your life.

From the Book Jacket: Every day amazing products fail, qualified candidates don’t get hired and world changing ideas die. The fact is, having the best resume or the strongest feature list doesn’t always guarantee success. Welcome to the world of Likeonomics, where deals are made on golf courses, likeability often trumps competence and the most important skill anyone can learn is how to build deeper and more trusted personal relationships.

About Likeonomics
(The Slightly Longer But More Fun Summary)

In a dusty Harlem classroom in 1912, a former lard salesman delivers a lecture that will one day change the world and lead him more than thirty years later to publish one of the best selling books of all time: How To Win Friends And Influence People.

In 1986 a relatively unknown talk show host and former beauty queen makes a stunning confession about being abused as a child in front of millions on national television.  Within two years she becomes a household icon known to her fans by only one name: Oprah.

In 1993 a former high school football star takes over a struggling regional branch of financial advisors ranked a lowly 173rd out of 176 American Express offices nationwide.  Within a year his branch claims the #1 spot, and keeps stays there for an unheard of 13 out of the next 15 years.

What do all of these stories share in common?  They all point to a fundamental truth: we all do business and build relationships with people we like.  The simple metric of likeability powers everything from who we believe to what we buy – and it is not about simply being nice.

The secret of success in business or in life was never about the money you earned or the products you made or the services you offered.  If that were true, the best product would always sell the most, and the most connected people would always be the most popular or inspirational.

Instead we live in a world where every day amazing products fail, qualified candidates don’t get hired and world changing ideas die. The fact is, having the best resume or the strongest feature list doesn’t always guarantee success.  Welcome to the world of Likeonomics, where deals are made on golf courses, likeability often trumps competence and the most important skill anyone can learn is how to build deeper and more trusted personal relationships in business and life.

In Likeonomics, award winning author, leading marketing strategist and Georgetown University Professor Rohit Bhargava offers a new vision of a world beyond the “Like” button where using likeability to build more powerful personal relationships is the real key to surviving the “modern believability crisis.”

Likeonomics uncovers five key principles of the TRUST formula to help people be more successful– Truth, Relevance, Unselfishness, Simplicity and Timing.   Written in a storytelling style,  the book shares dozens of real-world stories of brands and people who have used these principles to become wildly successful, including:

  • A unknown Portuguese singer who used YouTube to rack up more than 30 million views and launchher professional career
  • An independent sports agent who achieved the impossible by landing the number 1 player in the NFL draft as a client through the power of relationships

Whether you are trying to grow your business, win an election or find your next job – and this book will help you do it.

The True Story Of the Making Of Likeonomics

View more presentations from Rohit Bhargava

Why Does Likeonomics Matter?

Likeonomics is a term that explains the new affinity economy where the most likeable people, ideas and organizations are the ones we believe in, buy from and get inspired by.

The concept of Likeonomics is based on 5 big insights into communications that have fundamentally shifted our understanding of how people choose to believe or reject ideas and messages. Each of these insights is something that has been reported over and over in media, extensively analyzed in best selling business and psychology books, explored through academic research and spotlighted in trend reports.  They are global and affect every culture.

#1. There is a modern believability crisis.

Overly hyped marketing messages and corporate greed have led consumers toward a fundamental distrust of business.  Social media is bringing more visibility to it, as people have more ways to uncover it than ever before. This is the modern believability crisis, and it is impacting every form of communication.

#2. People make decisions emotionally, not logically.

The way we make decisions has not changed, but our understanding of it has. Best selling books like Predictably Irrational, Blink, and Sway – as well as mountains of new brain research point to the fact that people are inherently irrational and that emotions play a fundamental and often misunderstood role in decision making.

#3. Stories are the most compelling form of communication.

Related to our understanding of the power of emotion is the growing attention on storytelling as the ultimate form of communication, as it has been for thousands of years. The people and organizations who tell better stories are the ones that inspire movements, get elected or sell millions of products.

#4. Simplicity is the foundation of all great communications.

People are paralyzed by too much choice and nothing can kill an idea faster than complexity.  The most iconic products and services of today, from the iPad to the Dyson Vacuum to the Flip Camera to Twitter all owe a great part of their success to their inherent ability to simplify everything about their experiences.  Simplicity is the secret weapon.

#5. In strangers (and “microexpertise”) we trust.

Wikipedia is only the most visible example of a revolution in trust that has meant that people are going online and trusting the opinions and expertise of people who they don’t know.  Content creation, aggregation and now … content curation are all new forms of microinfluence and they are shifting everything we know about trust.